The Daily Scott Scheper

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San Diego, CA 92101

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ISSUE NO. 246

Unlike Hierarchical Taxonomies Antinets (Analog Zettelkastens) are Not About Creating Order From Chaos

FROM:

Scott P. Scheper

Downtown San Diego, CA

TO:

You*

START:

Wednesday 7:20 pm

Dear Friend,

One thing people have difficulty grasping relates to hierarchical taxonomies. People continually confuse the antinets structure as hierarchical. In brief, it is not.

First, let's talk about taxonomies.

Taxonomy derives from the Greek term, taxis, which translates to order; and the term -nomy derives from nomos (Greek) for the science of.[1]

Taxonomies and metadata are nearly identical.[2] The purposes of taxonomies center around three primary facets: First, taxonomies make for cleaner data indexes. Second, they make for more efficient data retrieval. Last, they aim to add more order to data, which aims to assist in navigating complexity.[1:1]

The Two Types of Taxonomies

There are two primary types of taxonomies

The first type of taxonomy is called a controlled vocabulary. These types of taxonomies center on a specific list of words for a specified subject matter. Key components of controlled vocabularies include preferred terms, and variant terms. Think of an index at the very back of the book. When you see phrases like, See {Preferred Term} or Use {Preferred Term}, here's what that means: It means the term you just looked up is a variant term. The author is pointing you to their preferred term for the subject matter at hand.

The second type of taxonomy is called a hierarchical taxonomy. These taxonomies are structured in such a way wherein the subject matter is broken apart into categories and subcategories. The format is Broad categoryspecific subcategoryeven more specific subcategory. It's a drill-down tree with nested items.

Think a format like this:

In brief, taxonomies aim to make order out of chaos.

Now, let's jump back to the world of the antinet.

When one explores the archive of Niklas Luhmann's system, they quickly see what Luhmann meant when he described his antinet as a system of "order and disorder".[3]

The antinet is a system that does not attempt to create order from chaos; it is a system that embraces chaos in a structured fashion. Indeed, it embraces chaos without one becoming overwhelmed.

The mechanism enabling one to not go crazy trying to "rely on our memory of numbers" is the Index (or the register; i.e. that map of your Tree of Knowledge).[4]

The mechanism enabling one to create a system embracing structured chaos is the Fixed ID. I refer to them as Notecard IDs (or NCID's).

This can be confusing for some because Notecard IDs are of a nature comprised of dashes (e.g. /). The dashes seem to indicate the items following it are somehow lower on a hierarchical position. Yet this is not the case. The position of any note reveals nothing about its theoretical importance. There exist no privileged positions in the web of notes.[5] For instance, Luhmann's most important work, his Theory of Society contains an important subsection. Yet its Notecard ID carries the seemingly insignificant position of 21/3d7fB.[6]

Yet it still seems rather difficult to grasp unless you try the system out for yourself.

That said, I have found it helpful to think of an analogy for the antinet in the absence of empirical testing.

But, you're going to have to wait for that... I'll continue where I left off tomorrow!

Until then,

Peace and love.

And always remember...

To stay crispy my friend.

Sincerely,

Scott P. Scheper

P.S. In the future, I'll be releasing a book on the true nature of Niklas Luhmann's Zettelkasten. I refer to Luhmanesque zettelkastens as, antinets.

Because you're an early supporter of mine, I've decided to do something that will end up costing me a lot of money...

I've decided to give you a copy of my new book, signed by me, and I'll even pay for the cost of shipping it to you!

I'll restate that. I will send you a free, signed copy of the book I release on the antinet. This book will show you precisely how Luhmann created an analog thinking mind. It will show you step-by-step how to create the system responsible for producing 70 books, and 550 papers. The antinet zettelkasten will enable you to create the genius-level work you're capable of producing.

All I ask is that you do the following:

  1. Write to me, in handwritten format.
  2. On the piece of paper write something like:

"Hey Scott! I'd like for you to send me a copy of your book on Antinet Zettelkastens. Oh, and I'd love for you to sign it too. Also, thanks Scott for paying the shipping cost!"

  1. Mail the above-handwritten letter to me at:

Scott P. Scheper
600 W. Broadway, Suite 700
San Diego, CA 92101

Mail this to me in the next week. After that, I may be pulling this offer down. But it's good at least for a week.

If you're reading this now it means the offer is still valid! Follow the steps outlined above... like right now! I'm serious!

That's all I'm gonna say on that.

If it's not obvious how much of a no-brainer this offer is at this point, then... well to hell with it. And to hell with you!

Kidding!

(Actually, I'm not. If you don't want a free book signed by me, you eat crayons).

Oh, and why am I asking you to write me a hand-written letter?

Because I want you to stop being a lazy pussy. I want you to invest time in someone who wants to change your life.

I'm not someone who wants the lazy-ass email addresses of average Joe-blows.

I want to communicate with the best people, and I want to serve the very best people.

The people I serve are ones serious enough about their growth and craft that gasp... they'll actually take the time to mail in a simple letter requesting a free book on it!

Alright, enough of my preaching. Turn off the noise and distraction of your mind. Do as I say. Seriously. Do this now:

  1. Write to me, in handwritten format.
  2. On the piece of paper write something like:

"Hey Scott! I'd like for you to send me a copy of your book on Antinet Zettelkastens. Oh, and I'd love for you to sign it too. Also, thanks Scott for paying the shipping cost!"

  1. Mail the above-handwritten letter to me at:

Scott P. Scheper
600 W. Broadway, Suite 700
San Diego, CA 92101

Got it?

Good!

Look forward to hearing from you soon.

P.P.S. I'd love for you to express any other ideas, or positive experiences you've had with an antinet (i.e. an analog zettelkasten).

Here's how you can help:

I'm active on the Reddit Zettelkasten community and intend to source your questions and comments there.

Here is a link to the Reddit Zettelkasten community:

https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/

You can find me on some thread there. Here's my user profile: https://www.reddit.com/user/sscheper


Footnotes:
  1. Hedden, Heather. The Accidental Taxonomist. Medford, N.J: Information Today, 2010. ↩︎ ↩︎

  2. According to one author, and professional taxonomist. See: Hedden, Heather. The Accidental Taxonomist. Medford, N.J: Information Today, 2010. Specifically, Chapter 1. ↩︎

  3. “Zettelkasten Online Paper by Niklas Luhmann: Communication with a Notebox (Revised Edition).” Accessed August 3, 2021. https://daily.scottscheper.com/zettelkasten/. See, "The described reduction to a fixed, but merely formal order of placement and the resulting combination of order and disorder is, however, one of these ways." ↩︎

  4. Ibid. See, "Considering the absence of a systematic order, we must regulate the process of rediscovery of notes, for we cannot rely on our memory of numbers." ↩︎

  5. Schmidt, Johannes. “Niklas Luhmann‘s Card Index: Thinking Tool, Communication Partner, Publication Machine.” Forgetting Machines. Knowledge Management Evolution in Early Modern Europe 53 (2016). https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2942475 (Page 298). ↩︎

  6. Ibid, see page 299. ↩︎

END:

Wednesday 8:11 pm

*Disclaimer: If you're NOT the type of person characterized here, then don't bother reading anything on this page.